Hope Before the Ruins

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Occupy Sandy

To paraphrase the anarchist revolutionary Buenaventura Durruti, we are not afraid of ruins because we know how to build a better world.

We have the technological capacity to abolish a fossil fuel powered global infrastructure and switch to renewable energy. Wind, water, and solar energy can “reliably supply the world’s needs” (Jacobson & Delucchi, 2009). We already have the “fundamental scientific, technical, and industrial know-how” to solve the climate crisis (Pacala & Socolow, 2004). Even under the global capitalist framework “market trends” are driving “new renewable energy deployment” (Anderson, 2017) and “investors” are increasingly divesting funds from fossil fuel developments (Johnston, 2016). We even have appropriate forms of geoengineering we can use to slow down and stabilise the biosphere while we put our global oikos in order (Lehmann, 2007; Becker et al., 2013; Biggers, 2015).

So what is stopping us?

adelbert1

Photo by Evergreen Energy Solutions

As Roberts (2017) warns “political and social barriers will do more to slow that growth than any technical limitation.” Clear leadership is needed to ensure clean technologies are promoted rather than the technologies of the entrenched fossil fuel industries (Jacobson & Delucchi, 2009). But this leadership must come from below, not above:

“The historical record shows very clearly that deep, enduring changes in energy industries require the mobilization of mass social movements. We cannot simply wait for visionary politicians to forge the way.” (Podobnik, 2010)

These social and political barriers will need overcoming if we are to ever properly confront the Biocrisis. Although we have the technology for a 100% renewable global system, the changes needed are monumental – “We can’t slap on a carbon tax and call it a day. We have to remake the world, and we have to talk about it” (Battistoni, 2012). To quote Chaudhary (2016), we must address the fact that “the crisis is not now, the crisis has already been for some time”. If we don’t, we risk facing a future with “the same winners, the similar losers, the crimes, the human degradation”.

A society powered by clean and renewable energy “is a necessity for a sustainable and equitable society, but not a guarantee of one” (McBay, 2011). But we do have an innate capacity for cooperation rather than competition, a capacity that is not encouraged in today’s capitalist society (Cott, 1980; Schwartzman, 2015; Taylor, 2016). Our future society will have to be modelled on values above and beyond commodification and profit if we are to survive. It will focus on democratic management of resources to prevent pollution and waste (Löwy, 2007), an “economically rational” society with needs guided by ecological standards (Bookchin, 1991). Whether we like it or not, we will have to transition to a situation where we accept and live within biophysical limits (Levy, 2012). As for green growth, it is a dangerous oxymoron if there ever was one.

Surviving and repairing the damage of the Biocrisis will

“require more ability to improvise together, stronger societies, more confidence in each other. It will require a world in which we are each other’s wealth and have each other’s trust.” (Solnit, 2009)

We should take hope in the rebellions already taking place. The story of the US National Park Service going “rogue”, at least on social media, presents a model of subversion within traditional institutions (Jacobin, 2017). Calls for the global science community to involve itself in protest and “rebellion” against climate change continue to mount (Klein, 2013; Johnston, 2017), a promising development in an otherwise detached and aloof institution. People everywhere are “turning to mutual aid, collectivity, cooperatives, communalist ventures and the commons for an alternative” to the status quo (Curl, 2016). A growing “climate insurgency” aims to use “activities the authorities claim to be illegal” in order to “create an irresistible momentum of escalating popular action for climate protection” (Brecher, 2017). Indeed, for multitudes of people across the world, these struggles are far from over – their resistance is just beginning (Bosworth, 2016).

From joining Blockadia to supporting divestment campaigns to standing in solidarity with refugees, there are many ways to fight climate chaos in the immediate future (Out of the Woods 2015; 2016). But to fully address and solve the host of problems that constitute the Biocrisis we will have to “raise long-range, transformative demands that the dominant economic and political systems may prove unable to accommodate” (Tokar, 2014).

Despite our optimism, it may well be that the transnational actors that control the global economy and enforce the world’s borders may be unwilling to adapt to or accommodate our demands for a better world. They may prefer to necrotise the entire planet (McBrien, 2016) rather than change their ways – after all, “one might more easily persuade a green plant to desist from photosynthesis than to ask the bourgeois economy to desist from capital accumulation” (Bookchin, 1980). We may inherit a world of irreversibly damaged ecosystems and little energy resources left to build our dreams (Keefer, 2009).

But as Gastón Gordillo and Andreas Malm agree, rubble is a gateway to the future. Malm (2017) prepares us for the fact that “we must accept that loss is a major predicament of our time”, but this loss, as Gordillo (2014) notes, represented by the rubble of the old world – a world of divisiveness, cruelty, and injustice – is “an invitation to remake the world differently”. A world of fairness, ecological balance, justice, and hope. A world where each contributes according to their ability, and each receives according to their need. Let us scoop the rubble into our hands and join together as “heroes in an army of construction” (Keller, 1916) to build our better world.

References

Anderson, A. (2017). The Fate of the Clean Power Plan under President Trump http://blog.ucsusa.org/angela-anderson/the-fate-of-the-clean-power-plan-under-president-trump Accessed 27th April 2017.

Battistoni, A. (2012). The Flood Next Time https://www.jacobinmag.com/2012/12/the-flood-next-time/ Accessed 27th April 2017.

Becker, K., Wulfmeyer, V., Berger, T., Gebel, J., Münch, W. (2013). Carbon farming in hot, dry coastal areas: an option for climate change mitigation. Earth System Dynamics 4, 237-251.

Biggers, J. (2015). Iowa’s Climate-Change Wisdom https://www.nytimes.com/2015/11/21/opinion/iowas-climate-change-wisdom.html Accessed 2nd May 2017.

Bookchin, M. (1980). Toward an Ecological Society. Black Rose Books, Montreal.

Bookchin, M. (1991). Libertarian Municipalism: An Overview https://theanarchistlibrary.org/library/murray-bookchin-libertarian-municipalism-an-overview.html Accessed 3rd May 2017.

Bosworth, K. (2016). Voices Against the Pipeline — “Five Lessons from Pipeline Struggles” http://nobakken.com/2016/09/05/voices-against-the-pipeline-five-lessons-from-pipeline-struggles-by-kai-bosworth/ Accessed 7th May 2017.

Brecher, J. (2017). A climate insurgency: building a Trump-free, fossil-free future http://www.theecologist.org/News/news_analysis/2988898/a_climate_insurgency_building_a_trumpfree_fossilfree_future.html Accessed 3rd May 2017.

Chaudhary, A. S. (2016). The Supermanagerial Reich https://lareviewofbooks.org/article/the-supermanagerial-reich/ Accessed 27th April 2017.

Cott, J. (1980). The Cosmos: An Interview With Carl Sagan http://www.rollingstone.com/culture/features/the-cosmos-19801225 Accessed 1st May 2017.

Curl, J. (2016). Reclaiming the American Commons https://roarmag.org/magazine/reclaiming-the-american-commons/ Accessed 3rd May 2017.

Gordillo, G. R. (2014). Rubble: The Afterlife of Destruction. Duke University Press, Durham.

Hudson, A. D. (2015). On the Political Dimensions of Solarpunk https://medium.com/solarpunks/on-the-political-dimensions-of-solarpunk-c5a7b4bf8df4 Accessed 2nd May 2017.

Jacobin (2017). The National Park Service Goes Rogue https://www.jacobinmag.com/2017/02/donald-trump-bureaucracy-national-park-service-smokey-bear/ Accessed 3rd May 2017.

Jacobson, M. Z., Delucchi, M. A. (2009). A Path to Sustainable Energy by 2030. Scientific American 301 (5), 58-65.

Johnston, I. (2016). The people providing hope in a post-Trump world of climate denial https://www.independent.co.uk/environment/climate-change-global-warming-donald-trump-divestment-renewable-energy-fossil-fuels-google-bill-a7471926.html Accessed 27th April 2017.

Johnston, I. (2017). World-leading climate change scientist calls for ‘rebellion’ against Donald Trump https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/donald-trump-climate-change-rebellion-michael-mann-global-warming-scientists-a7556696.html Accessed 3rd May 2017.

Keefer, T. (2009). Fossil Fuels, Capitalism, And Class Struggle. The Commoner 13, 15-21.

Keller, H. (1916). Strike Against War http://www.historyisaweapon.com/defcon1/helenstrike.html Accessed 23rd May 2017.

Klein, N. (2013). Naomi Klein: How science is telling us all to revolt http://www.newstatesman.com/2013/10/science-says-revolt Accessed 3rd May 2017.

Lehmann, J. (2007). A handful of carbon. Nature 447, 143-144.

Levy, G. (2012). Natural limits, sustainability and socialism https://peopleandnature.wordpress.com/article-store/the-trouble-with-economic-growth/natural-limits-sustainability-and-socialism/ Accessed 3rd May 2017.

Löwy, M. (2007). Eco-Socialism and Democratic Planning. Socialist Register 43, 1-16.

Malm, A. The Walls of the Tank: On Palestinian Resistance http://salvage.zone/in-print/the-walls-of-the-tank-on-palestinian-resistance/ Accessed 23rd May 2017.

McBay, A. (2011). A Taxonomy of Action. In: McBay, A., Keith, L., Jensen, D. eds. Deep Green Resistance: Strategy to Save the Planet. Seven Stories Press, New York, 239-276.

McBrien, J. (2016). Accumulating Extinction: Planetary Catastrophism in the Necrocene. In Moore, J. ed. Anthropocene or Capitalocene? Nature, History, and the Crisis of Capitalism. PM Press, San Francisco, 116-137.

Out of the Woods (2015). 6 Ways to Fight Climate Chaos http://novaramedia.com/2015/05/30/6-ways-to-fight-climate-chaos/ Accessed 15th May 2017.

Out of the Woods (2016). Infrastructure against borders https://libcom.org/blog/infrastructure-against-borders-06122016 Accessed 15th May 2017.

Pacala, S., Socolow, R. (2004). Stabilization Wedges: Solving the Climate Problem for the Next 50 Years with Current Technologies. Science 305 (5686), 986-972.

Podobnik, B. (2010). Building the Clean Energy Movement: Future Possibilities in Historical Perspective. In: Abramsky, K.. ed. Sparking a Worldwide Energy Revolution: Social Struggles in the Transition to a Post-petrol World. AK Press, Oakland, 72-80.

Roberts, D. (2017). Is 100% renewable energy realistic? Here’s what we know http://www.vox.com/energy-and-environment/2017/4/7/15159034/100-renewable-energy-studies Accessed 27th April 2017.

Schwartzman, D. (2015). From Climate Crisis to Solar Communism https://www.jacobinmag.com/2015/12/cop-21-paris-climate-change-global-warming-fossil-fuels/ Accessed 1st May 2017.

Solnit, R. (2009). A Paradise Built in Hell: The Extraordinary Communities That Arise in Disaster. Viking Press, New York.

Taylor, S. (2016). How Natural is War to Human Beings? https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/out-the-darkness/201609/how-natural-is-war-human-beings Accessed 2nd May 2017.

Tokar, B. (2014). Toward Climate Justice: Perspectives on the Climate Crisis and Social Change (2nd edition). New Compass Press, Porsgrunn.

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One thought on “Hope Before the Ruins

  1. Pingback:  Fighting The Biocrisis | syndax vuzz

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